Archives for posts with tag: mental health

When considering breaking it off with someone, here are four things to think about:

IMG_3603.JPG
Do you still get butterflies?
When you look at his picture or think back to a special date, do you get those familiar feelings in your body affectionately known as “butterflies”? When we still care deeply about someone, there is always that feeling, even if it was been turned off due to problems in the relationship. If you still blush when you think back to a stolen kiss or laugh at a recent inside joke, there is still some spark and it just might be the right amount needed to relight the fire.


Are the issues workable?

People are different and what they find to be acceptable in a relationship may vastly differ than another person. This would be a time to reflect on what you find acceptable in a relationship and if what’s happening is not acceptable, then it may be time to reevaluate your role in the relationship. If the issues are workable, then you might want to give it another try because in the end you may always wonder what would have happened if you had an extra talk or if you tried something outside of the box.

Are you willing to work them out?
Speaking of things outside of the box, are you willing to do that? Are you willing to put yourself outside of your comfort zone to improve your relationship? If you are willing, you may find that your significant other is willing to step outside of his norm and meet you halfway in dealing with your problems.

Do you love him?
Love is the reason we are in relationships. It’s the unexplainable thing that ties two people together when no other explanation makes sense. If you can honestly answer that you are still in love with him and you come from that place of love, it will always conquer all. Love is the foundation and if that isn’t broken then you can always repair the damages.

IMG_3604.JPG

Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

The Do’s

1. Do put your best foot forward

– This is your first impression with your potential new mate. Wear something nice. Think of it like an interview. Dress to impress without overdoing it

2. Do monitor your thinking

– If you catch yourself in your head, employ thought stopping techniques. Be in the moment during your date and enjoy your time together

3. Do go in with a positive outlook

– The point of dating is to find your other half. Let go of the worry that will come with a new date. Look forward to what this date could be, as opposed to worrying about every and anything

4. Do share about yourself

– Again, this is like a job interview. Open up to that person on things you feel comfortable sharing. Having open communication is one of the foundations of a relationship

5. Do order whatever food you would normally get

– I’ve heard time and time again that many women order salads on the first date. This sets up a false impression. Go into the date as yourself and let the person appreciate that you might love quesadillas, not just lettuce and tomatoes!

6. Do have a good time

– Dating can be a lot of fun. It’s like opening up presents; you never know what surprise you might receive

IMG_3439.JPG

The Dont’s

1. Don’t place a lot of expectations on the other person

– It’s the first date. Don’t start dreaming up the next ten years of your life. Live in the moment

2. Don’t mislead the person on what you are looking for

– If you are looking for marriage, be upfront about it to manage the other person’s expectations

3. Don’t overshare

– I know #4 under “Do’s” says share, but there are some things you shouldn’t share on a first date, like exes or family drama

4. Don’t discuss politics, religion or other sensitive topics

– This goes along with the above but it needs to be reiterated. Telling a person your religion is appropriate but going into detail or trying to convert someone is not the best approach

5. Don’t worry too much

– Just breathe and be! It’s a first date, not a marriage proposal. Just use positive thoughts and affirmations to stay in the moment

6. Don’t be afraid to be the first one to reach out after the date

– There are a ton of “rules” regarding communication. Throw them out and do what feels right. If you want to text them the next day, then do it. If you want to call and plan the next date, then do it. If you are worried about this, read #5 again

IMG_3440.JPG

Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

The beginning of the school year is upon us and those in the sorority life circle know that means one thing: Recruitment. Recruitment is like Black Friday from the rest of the world. It’s the time when sororities go into “the black” and have met their numbers for the year. New members trample over each other to make it to their new home. And in the end, just like with the holidays, it is all worth it when you step back and look at the smiles on everyone’s faces on bid day.

So you’ve come across this blog. Are you a new student interested in joining a sorority? Are you already in a sorority and need a push to recommit at 100%? Are you an alumna of a sorority looking for confirmation that yes indeed being in a sorority and still committed even though you graduated is still a good idea? Are you a parent worried about your daughter starting college and possibly joining a sorority? Are you a curious bystander interested in learning more about greek life and/or mental health? Then this blog is for you!

Being in a sorority is good for a woman’s mental health and here are four ways that it helps improve emotional wellbeing.

Teaches you to take care of yourself
Most sororities have a set of values or pillars that they work off of. Delta Phi Epsilon has what they call the 5 S’s, as a part of their Personal Development Program. One of the S’s is self. Each year, women are encouraged to do things to nurture themselves. These things can include developing a workout plan, committing to going to therapy establishing long-term and short-term goal, running a marathon or any other activity geared at developing a deep sense of self and personal accomplishment.

What is does is teach women at a young age that they are important. That even though they need to get good grades, give back to the sorority, be a member of their family and probably have a boyfriend, they need to incorporate me time into their routine. Women can lose sight of their personhood, especially when more responsibilities are placed on them. A valuable skill being taught in sororities is how to make taking care of yourself a priority.

Need some ideas on how to take care of yourself: create vision boards for your life, join a gym or find a therapist to help you work on what’s holding you back from fully embracing and developing your sense of self.

Teaches you to give back
Each year, across college campuses, sororities and fraternities alike plan and execute philanthropy events to raise funds and awareness for a variety of issues. Zeta Tau Alpha raises money and holds events every October for breast cancer awareness month. On a local level, sorority women host flag football games, male beauty contests, soccer tournaments, fashion shows, benefit concerts and more to support their philanthropy. Women spend their time planning the events and securing funds to meet their goals. And what does this do for women? It teaches them to give back to their community. It teaches them to think about the needs of others who are less fortunate and how their contributions can impact them. It teaches them to become civically engaged and plugged into what is going on in the country and world, especially when it comes to disease, illness and special needs populations. Philanthropy events are fun and it helps women to be connected to an organization and be willing to give money and time and build relationships with people.

Teaches you to see the future
Sororities have a mantra: Not for four years, but a lifetime. When you join a sorority, it is not just about the here and now. It is about making a lifelong commitment to your sorority, to the university, to the philanthropy and to your sisters. It’s about knowing that there will be something out there for you when you graduate from college. It’s about being able to connect with other alumnae if you happen to move to another city. It’s about being a bridesmaid in your sister’s wedding or having them in yours. It teaches women to think about what they want their future to look like and what skills and tools does the sorority have to help them reach it.

Teaches you to see how we are all connected
Being in a sorority is about being connected to yourself, sorority sisters, Panhellenic sisters and the university. These connections often mirror what is like to be in the real world. There are meetings and events and responsibilities to manage in a sorority and in adult life. Women will learn how to see themselves as a part of a bigger force. Women will learn to see how people are connected in this world. There are many stories of people going in for a job interview and being interviewed by someone in their sorority. Just recently a group of DPhiE sisters were in Disney for their convention and they were taking a picture in their letters, a woman stopped them to share how she was a DPhiE at her school and explained how she was able to reconnect through facebook. It’s moments like that which solidifying being in a sorority is all about connections.

Being in a sorority is a personal decision people can take and it’s not for everyone. As a lifelong member of a sorority, I continue to find value in wearing my letters. As a therapist, I work with teenagers and help them to explore ways to develop who they are. For me, being in a sorority helped define who I became and for that I am forever grateful. Interested in finding out more about sororities, the National Panhellenic Conference has information for you to explore.

20140804-130049-46849619.jpg

Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

20140722-233147-84707029.jpg
Anxiety can bring on the thought that nothing is going to get better. It can make it seem like the night will never end, especially when you can’t sleep. Or that nothing is going to change, especially if things haven’t been going your way. Anxiety can be an uneasy feeling in your chest or your stomach. It can be unhealthy thoughts in your mind. It can be tightness in your chest. Anxiety comes in many shapes and sizes, depending on the person. How does your anxiety manifest in you?

The real root of anxiety has to do with thinking patterns and belief systems. People go through life and have experiences and those experiences help shape thoughts and beliefs. If you grew up in a household where your parent’s belief system was that dangerous things happen to people, you probably took on the belief system that the world is dangerous, especially if something dangerous (or dangerous enough) happened to you when you were younger. It would look something like this: Your parents warned you how dangerous the monkey bars are. You decide to go on them anyways because you’re a kid and sometimes kids don’t do what their parents tell them to do. You slip on the monkey bars and bust your lip. You probably feel pretty scared about your lip and now you start to see the monkey bars as dangerous. And what also begins to happen is you start seeing many parts of the world as scary, not just the monkey bars. You continue to live your life through a lens that the world is a scary place.

When you live your life as though the world is scary, then everything tends to be scary. One of the ways to tell that you have a belief system that the world is something to be feared is the presence of catastrophizing in your life, assuming the worst in a situation or making something out to be worse than it really presents. Here’s an example of what catastrophizing looks like: Your alarm doesn’t go off in the morning and you are going to be late for work. You start to feel anxious in your stomach as your mind goes on to tell you that you are going to get fired for this. Your mind tells you this automatically, even though you are rarely late and you received a positive annual evaluation. It’s the thought that whatever is about to happen is going to be huge and it isn’t going to be good. Other examples of catastrophizing might include thinking you are going to be broke when you have to take money from savings, assuming your significant other is cheating on you if they don’t answer their phone or expecting to crash on a plane on the way to your vacation, even though statistically you are more likely to be hurt in the car on the way to the airport.

Another prevalent thinking pattern that can show up is black or white thinking. It’s where a person only sees things in terms of yes or no, black or white, on or off. This thinking does not allow for any gray area or the possibility that two things might both be correct. Sometimes things can be black and white. Imagine you are in a relationship and you get into a fight. A fight for someone who sees the world as dangerous will see a fight as something very bad or wrong. They will be worried about fighting and how it will affect the relationship. They might get really anxious thinking about having to talk to their significant other about their wants or needs because it may lead to a fight. So they go into all or nothing thinking. They assume that if they express their needs that the fight will lead to a negative outcome, instead of seeing a fight as a fight and something that can occur and can be resolved without any real danger. The danger that a fight might signal the end of a relationship is only a form of black and white thinking. What many people do then is nothing at all and they sit with the anxiety, because it feels better to deal with the anxiety then risk that something major and scary might come along. This is a prime example of why people don’t take control of their lives to make changes, doing just that is scary in and of itself.

So what do you do if you want to feel less anxious in your life? The answer is to change your thinking patterns and belief systems. Start to see situations as they really are. Begin to think in terms of gray. Challenge and change that belief system that is no longer working for you. It takes work to change unhealthy to healthy, but in the end you will feel a relief of anxiety.

We’ll pick back up on the belief system that the world is dangerous. That is the core belief system a person may have. In order to challenge and change it, you need to begin to look at the world with a different frame of reference. You need to look for ways in which the world is indeed safe. You will need to look for it high and low, and in every area of your life. Look for ways you are safe at home and at work. Ways you have been safe over the years, even in times of stress or danger. Look for ways your life can become safer. Become motivated to change any of the ways you can make their world a safer place to live in. For instance, if you feel unsafe at night because of the neighborhood you live in, consider moving to somewhere more safe. How have you been safe over the years? How can you become safer in your life today? How are you safe in your world? What are the signs you can see that the world is safe? How often do dangerous things happen to you? Do you have control over the dangerous things happening in your life?

Another surefire way to change belief systems and thinking patterns is through the usage of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. This is an evidenced based approach to treat anxiety and one of the major techniques taught to mental health counselors, social workers and psychologists, both in school and through workshops. The whole premise of CBT is to change your thoughts in order to change your behavior. It’s proven to work with anxiety and symptom relief can be accomplished through short-term therapy with a skilled clinician. When looking for a therapist, look for someone with a specialization in both anxiety and CBT. It should be clearly outlined on the website or marketing materials. Have you considered receiving therapy? Do you know where to find a good therapist at? Are you willing to receive CBT? What are the potential benefits to receiving therapy? Do you have any fears about going into counseling? What are you looking to get out of counseling?

Getting a self-help book can provide a supplement to therapy. One of my favorite books that I recommend is “The Feeling Good Handbook“by David Burns. There are specific chapters on anxiety and how to deal with it. There is a chapter on several types of thinking patterns, including the ones listed about. It gives you many strategies to challenge and change your thinking. It gives you information about medication, in case you are considering seeing a psychiatrist, alternative healer or going to a local vitamin shop to get natural anti-anxiety pills. This workbook is designed for you to follow it as it applies to you. It gives you activities to complete, as well as writing prompts for you to sort out how your anxiety works in your life and how the implementation of the techniques worked for you.

The good news is that anxiety is treatable. You can get symptom relief through many avenues. It’s about finding the one that works for you.

20140722-231934-83974307.jpg

Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

Building a relationship or keeping one takes a balance of having a person maintain their identity and creating a life as a couple. It is easy to fall into a relationship and lose yourself in the moment. When you start to put 100% of your energy into your relationship, you risk the chance of losing your identity and independence in the process. Here are some tips for you to continue to do throughout your relationship as a way to maintain your “I”.

1. Keep your own hobbies

It’s always fun to date someone who has similar interests as you. This way on Saturday afternoon you can both go paddle boarding. But what about Sunday? Chances are he might be watching football. She might be reading the latest Chick Lit book. What are you going to do with your time? Find or maintain your own hobbies. Find a new local coffee shop, go to the gym or meet up with some friends at a 5k. Having your own hobbies is important for your sense of self and efficacy.

20140415-171051.jpg

2. Make time for family without your significant other

Again, this is an easy routine to fall into. Of course your significant other will be at every holiday and major event. However, sometimes it’s important to take time with your family, for you. There is a different level of comfort and openness between family members. Take the time to go to lunch with your sibling and share about your relationship, work or whatever else is on your mind.

20140415-165708.jpg

3. Enjoy time with your friends

When we get into relationships, it’s natural for your friendships to fall to the wayside. This is a normal process that happens; however it is also important to recognize that it is happening and recommit to incorporating a balance. Just like with your family, take the afternoon to go out with your best friends. The time you spend apart will make you appreciate your other person just a little bit more when you get home.

When you find yourself losing yourself in your relationship, just take a deep breath, recommit to your other relationships (including the one to yourself) and enjoy the time you spend both with and without your partner.

20140415-165905.jpg

Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

We’ve all been in a position where we really wanted to say no, but we found ourselves saying yes. Yes to a project at work when the old project is still in your desk. Yes to meet up with a friend for dinner when you’re exhausted from work. Yes to a child wanting a toy when your budget is tight this month. Logically, you know that you “should” say no but there is an emotional component that leads to the “Sure I can do that”.

Looking for approval from others
When you look outside of yourself for approval, you will find that you won’t be able to say no because you want that person to approve of you. What better way to get someone to approve of you then to say yes to their wishes. Where does your need for approval come from? That’s an important question to explore because without resolving your need to people please, you will not be able to do what is right for you.

Putting others first
Saying yes when we mean no also comes from a place where we deny our needs and think of the needs of others first. This is a very common pattern with parents. They deny themselves things and give 100% to those children. The downfall to that is when you give 100% the first time to someone else, you won’t have any to give to yourself. Then you aren’t recharging and becoming more available to those you care about. Why do you put yourself last? The answer will help you to deal with underlying feelings, such as shame, that lead you to deny your self.

Not sticking to your values and priorities
This is a common theme when it comes to saying yes to things related to money. If you value saving money and living within your means, then there might be many times when you have to say no to things so you can stick to your priorities of saving money. If you value your personal time, then saying no when you are asked to stay late at work. What are your values and when have there been times when you said yes to something that was in direct conflict with your values?

There are questions under each section. They are a good start to journaling on this subject if you are struggling with being a “Yes Man” when you really want to
be a “Thank you but no” person.

20140222-085424.jpg

Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

Here’s a list of things to do today to improve your mood:

1. Exercise

20131212-120028.jpg

2. Read a book

20131212-120037.jpg

3. Watch your favorite funny movie

20131212-120056.jpg

4. Make a list of five things you are grateful for

20131212-120115.jpg

5. Pay it forward

20131212-120122.jpg

6. Call a friend

20131212-120129.jpg

7. Treat yourself to a spa day at your house

20131212-120135.jpg

8. Sing in the car

20131212-120141.jpg

9. Reframe your experience

20131212-120150.jpg

10. Use positive affirmations

20131212-120158.jpg
Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

The holidays are often cited as having highest incidences of suicides per year. The holidays are meant to be a celebration and a joyous event. Many times the holidays bring on emotional and financial stress. Going into these holidays, you may be thinking to yourself, “How am I going to be able to get through them?”. Below is a list of things to do in order to have a more fulfilling holiday experience.

1. Increase your holiday activities
It may seem counterproductive that you would throw yourself into more activities; however when working with clients who are depressed one of my first recommendations is to increase pleasurable activities. Wear the ugly sweater on Ugly Sweater Day at work. Go to a Christmas tree lighting ceremony. Pick something you loved to do as a kid during the holidays and do it (ice skating or writing a letter to Santa). Give into the holiday spirit and see where it takes you.

2. Give thanks and time to others
This is a focus around Thanksgiving. When you thank people, you are honoring them and the relationship you have with them only stands to get better through gratitude. You can take another spin on this and give back to those who are in need. You can buy a present for a child and donate it. You can serve Thanksgiving dinner at a soup kitchen. Find whatever speaks to you and give to others.

3. Give thanks to yourself
Taking time for yourself and to regroup is just as important as going places and seeing people. Women from all over the country have begun watching Lifetime and Hallmark channel Christmas movies. Carve out a night where you make it your holiday night. Have a festive drink, watch a holiday movie and wear your favorite holidays pajamas. Men can create their own version of this by watching Bad Santa, drinking seasonal flavored beers and breaking out the Santa boxers.

4. Only do as much as you can
We are a consumer society and the holidays are reinforced by it. There are the holiday meals, the presents, the decorations, the ugly sweaters, the Christmas trees, the Hanukkah bushes, the cards, and the list goes on and on. Having a solid plan for your holiday spending is wise. Make a list of what your expected expenses will be and set a budget from there. Be realistic with your budget and communicate it assertively. Sometimes the stress of it is figuring out where you are going to get the money for the holidays. An appropriate mantra would be “I do as much as I can do”.

I hope everyone has a wonderful beginning to the holiday season. With some mental preparation, it can go smoothly. Happy Thanksgving and Happy Hanukkah!

20131126-231308.jpg
Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

This upcoming weekend, I have a trip to Disney World planned. Disney is one of those places where it’s perfectly acceptable and normal for adults to be kids.  What if the rest of the world was like that?

Sometimes, people forget what it’s like to be little.  Inside of each of us lives the innocent and adventurous child we once were.  When you dig deep down inside, you are able to fully embrace that part of your life.   Then you can let your inner child out to play. 

What if you could take your inner child to work every day? How would you show up differently? Would you listen to Disney music all day and celebrate small successes with a piece of chocolate? I bet employee relationships would improve because when people relate to each other on the level of the inner child, it is without judgment, resentment or anger. It’s out of pure love, enjoyment and fun.

What if you could bring that carefree attitude into your relationships? What if your main goal was to engage and interact with other people that would get your inner child excited? It might look like board games after dinner or coloring with markers.  It might be telling a joke when the tension has gotten too high during a discussion. It might include eating ice cream every night of the weekend!

How easy it is to forget the connection with your inner child.  So as a reminder, take time for yourself today to connect with your inner child, the innocent part of you, who is dying to go to Disney and sing all of the songs from their favorite movies.

photo

Photo credit: Pinterest

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.

One of the main reasons I was drawn to “Life Counseling Center of Broward” was the feel of the office. It’s warm and inviting. I knew right when I walked in it was where I was meant to be.

20130731-203549.jpg

Amanda Patterson, LMHC, CAP decided to become a therapist while attending Nova Southeastern University. She saw the need to help people achieve the life they wanted to live, while creating a life of her own. She completed her master’s in Mental Health Counseling and started a career in the juvenile justice arena. Since then, she has started a private practice in Pembroke Pines Florida, specializing in depression, anxiety relationship issues, and substance abuse. Amanda is a believer in holistic treatment and she practices veganism, meditation and yoga in her life. Find out more about her practice here. For a free 15-minute consultation, call or text Amanda at 954-258-8845 or email her at amanda@amandapattersonlmhc.com.